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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia found in the catalog.

Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia

R. W. Duncan

Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia

by R. W. Duncan

  • 42 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Canadian Forestry Service, Pacific Forestry Centre, Pacific Forestry Centre in Victoria, B.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest insects,
  • Trees -- Diseases and pests,
  • Pine

  • Edition Notes

    StatementR.W. Duncan.
    SeriesPest leaflet / Pacific Forestry Centre -- FPL-73, Forest pest leaflet -- no. 73.
    ContributionsPacific Forestry Centre., Canadian Forestry Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13621621M
    OCLC/WorldCa31928170

    Lodgepole Pine. Pinus contorta – Lodgepole pine, an evergreen conifer tree, is the provincial tree of Alberta. The leaves are needle-like, paired and often twisted, and cm long. In the late spring, small male cones at the branch tips release pollen.   Forest Entomology: insight into the outbreak dynamics and impacts of major forest insects of BC November , Revelstoke BC. Course Description. This course will introduce students to the major forest insects, both beneficial, and those considered pests, that are commonly found in interior forests of British Columbia.

    beetle, recorded only from southern parts of the range of lodgepole pine, probably occurs over more of the range of lodgepole pine in British Columbia than indicated in Fig. 1. The most frequent and extensive outbreaks occurred in south central and southeastern British Columbia (Powell ). At . except jack pine (Pinus banksiana), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea). Jack pine is a relatively small, short-lived, early successional tree occurring in the eastern and central parts of taiga east of the Rocky Mountains. Lodgepole pine is a longer-lived, early successional species growing in western Canada.

    Tortricidae), and terminal weevils such as Pissodes terminalis Hop-ping and Pissodes strobi Peck (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were recorded when observed on host trees (primarily lodgepole pine and hybridspruce).Becausetheir impactwaslow comparedwithWarren root collar weevils, however, their occurrence is not reported further here. the upper surface of branches and some terminal buds, often in the upper part of the tree. Warren root collar weevils feed on most pine and spruce species in Canada (Cerezke, ). In western Canada, reported hosts include lodgepole pine; white spruce Picea glauca Moench; western white pine Pinus monticola Douglas ex D. Don; Engelmann spruce Picea.


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Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia by R. W. Duncan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Terminal and Root-Collar Weevils of Lodgepole Pine in British Columbia. Forestry Canada, Forest Insect and Disease Survey, Forest Pest Leaflet No. 73 6p. Introduction Lodgepole pine has become increasingly important as a source of timber and pulpwood in British Columbia.

More intensive management of lodgepole pine stands will necessitate. terminalis attacks the current year's leaders, whereas adult M. gentilis and Cylindrocopturus sp. feed on foliage. All three weevil species utilize lodgepole pine terminal shoots for breeding.

Larval feeding under the bark almost always results in the death of the terminal. The terminal weevils have a complex of natural enemies in British Columbia.

The lodgepole terminal weevil, Pissodes terminalisHopping, feeds in the current year’s terminal growth causing dieback, height growth loss and consequent deformity in the main stem. The lodgepole terminal weevil attacks and kills the current year’s terminal growth on immature trees 2 to 7 m high.

Terminal weevils are found on pine and spruce throughout most regions in British Columbia. They can harm tree volume and wood quality by causing stem deformation and height loss.

Root collar weevils are typically pests of young plantations and can cause mortality by feeding on a tree's root collar. Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia.

Duncan, R.W. Agriculture Canada, Ministry of State for Forestry and Mines, Pacific Forestry Centre, Victoria, BC. Forest Pest Leaflet Duncan, R.W. Beetle-Proofed Lodgepole Pine Stands in Interior British Columbia Have Less Damage from Mountain Pine Beetle on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Beetle-Proofed Lodgepole Pine Stands in Interior British Columbia Have Less Damage from Mountain Pine BeetleFormat: Hardcover. Pissodes terminalis, Magdalis gentilis and Cylindrocopturus sp. emerged from dead leaders collected from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) between 7 and 11 May at 2 sites in British Columbia.

gentilis began to emerge at the beginning of May, while Pissodes terminalis and Cylindrocopturus sp. emerged a month later. Parasitoids reared from infested terminals belonged to 9 species in 6. Beetle-proofed lodgepole pine stands in interior British Columbia have less damage from mountain pine beetle Information report ; BC-X Includes summary in French.

Includes bibliographic references. ISBN Cat. Fo/E 1. Lodgepole pine – Diseases and pests – Control – British Columbia. Lodgepole Pine is British Columbia's only native two-needled conifer Lodgepole Pineis the most widespread tree in the province Along the treeline and the Pacific Coast, the tree is often contorted and shrubby hence the name Pinus Contorta.

Ministry of Forests Forest Science Program A Summary of Early Results from Recent Lodgepole Pine Thinning Experiments in the British Columbia Interior. An emerging concern is the migration of Warren root collar weevil Hylobius warreni from stands with a reduced host pool, i.e.

those with a high per cent of mature, dead lodgepole pine, into young. The distribution and abundance of Warren’s collar weevil, Hylobius warreni Wood (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was examined in lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta var.

latfolia Engelni, plantations in the Kispiox Forest District in north-central British Columbia. The effect of weevil feeding damage on height growth of dominant and co-dominant trees was also examined.

The weevil was found. The hosts and distribution of the root collar weevils Hylobius pinicola (Couper) and H. warreni W ood in British Columbia. J ournal of the Entomological Society of BC –6. British Columbia. Approximat copies of the first edition were printed and distributed by the Canadian Forest Service and former B.C.

Ministry of Forests, and several hundred copies per year of the second edition (revised and renamed Field Guide to Forest Damage in British Columbia, ) have been sold to the public through an agreement.

Native to North America, the white pine weevil occurs throughout the range of white pine in eastern Canada. In western Canada, its distribution coincides with that of various species of spruce. This insect was first described in by W. Peck, a professor at Harvard University.

Micro-habitat(s) Bud, Twig, Terminal shoot. Damage, symptoms. TERMINAL WEEVIL, (Pissodes terminalis) BACKGROUND. The terminal weevil is an important pest of open growing young pine trees.

It can cause considerable deformity to the tree’s main stem. This species is native to North America. DISTRIBUTION. The terminal weevil ranges from Manitoba to British Columba and Yukon and south to California. British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. future, and more might be anticipated in areas where the mountain pine beetle has not yet reached epidemic levels.

People are concerned for many reasons. At a minimum, the loss of mature lodgepole pine trees will significantly change the present and future appearance of affected forests for half a century. The lodgepole terminal weevil, Pissodes terminalis Hopping (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), probably is the most important • insect affecting young lodgepole pine.

Adult weevils usually oviposit in elongating terminal leaders, which are killed when larvae mine through the phloem, sapwood, and pith (Salman. Key insects groups include bark beetles, terminal and root collar weevils, defoliators and secondary insects (predators and agents of decomposition).

Recognition of insects through signs and symptoms of the host are emphasized along with their ecological role in forest dynamics, response to climate and forest management. Weevils Widely Scattered Through Pine Forests by Liz Osborn In young lodgepole pine plantations of central British Columbia, Warren root collar weevils attacked anywhere from 10 to 45 percent of saplings.

R. W. Duncan has written: 'Terminal and root-collar weevils of lodgepole pine in British Columbia' -- subject(s): Diseases and pests, Trees, Pine, Forest insects Asked in Celebrity Births Deaths.In British Columbia, some plant communities have been classified as critically imperiled.

Interesting fact: Half of the cones on a Lodgepole Pine are serotinous, meaning they are fire activated for seed release and burned areas are quickly reseeded.Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) is widely distributed over nearly all of British Columbia and is one of four western species of pine found in the Kootenay Interior wet belt.

In favourable conditions, sizes range from 12 to 24 inches in diameter and 50 to feet in height.